Ingeniøren selects Reverse Photosynthesis as best Danish research result of 2016 – University of Copenhagen

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03 January 2017

Ingeniøren selects Reverse Photosynthesis as best Danish research result of 2016

In 2016 researchers from CPSC were involved in the breakthrough discovery of Reverse Photosynthesis. This has been selected as the best Danish research result of 2016 by the journal Ingeniøren. The discovery is also listed on DR Videnskab’s list of 12 scientific high points of the year.

 
Selected as best research result of the year in Ingeniøren

Reverse Photosynthesis has been selected as the best Danish research result of 2016 by the jornal Ingeniøren. Since 2004 the journal has selected the best research results carried out by researchers in Denmark within natural sciences and technical sciences. The results have to be published before 1 November in a recognized scientific journal.

According to Ingeniøren this year’s winner is a good example of how the most groundbreaking discoveries often happen when researchers either design completely new characteristics, which are not found in nature, or they discover an unknown or overlooked process that turns our understanding of things upside down.

Ingeniøren’s selection of the best research result in 2016.

Among DR Videnskab’s 12 scientific high points of 2016

Reverse photosynthesis is in the company of space rockets, ancient Greenland sharks, gravitational waves and artificial intelligence on DR Videnskabs list of scientific highlights of 2016. The website wrote about the discovery back in April. You can read the article and watch a video about the experiment here.

DR Videnskab’s selection of 12 scientific high points of 2016.

More about the discovery of Reverse Photosynthesis

In 2016 researchers at Copenhagen Plant Science centre were involved in the discovery of a natural process described as reverse photosynthesis. In the process, the energy in solar rays breaks down, rather than builds plant material, as is the case with photosynthesis. The sunlight is collected by chlorophyll, the same molecule as used in photosynthesis.

Combined with a specific enzyme the energy of sunlight now breaks down plant biomass, with possible uses as chemicals, biofuels or other products, that might otherwise take a long time to produce. By increasing production speed while reducing pollution, the discovery has the potential to revolutionize industrial production.

The research results have been published in Nature Communications.

Read the news story about the discovery: Biotech breakthrough: Sunlight can be used to produce chemicals and energy.